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Burundi USAID-BEST Analysis, 2013.

The Burundi USAID-BEST Analysis examines the state of agricultural markets in Burundi as of August 2013 to inform future food security programming. This study presents an overview of local markets and food security programs, an assessment of the feasibility of monetization to fund a Title II program, and recommendations for upcoming program design. While production ostensibly has the potential to increase in Burundi, it has fallen by more than 40 percent since 2000. As a result, households devote an average 60 percent of their expenditures on food, and many go hungry during lean seasons. Title II programs can provide the necessary support, especially during those lean seasons, with yellow split peas, pinto beans, refined vegetable oil, and soy-fortified cornmeal or bulgur for food-for-work rations, and corn soy blend for preventative rations for mothers and young children. The team also found that while the monetization of wheat flour would be inappropriate, a relatively large amount of wheat grain could be safely monetized in Burundi.

Madagascar USAID-BEST Analysis, 2013.

The Madagascar USAID-BEST Analysis assesses the state of agricultural markets in Madagascar as of June 2013 to inform future food security programming. This study presents an overview of local markets and food security programs, an assessment of the feasibility of monetization, and recommendations for upcoming program design. The biggest barrier to food security in Madagascar is chronic poverty; in rural areas, food represents more than 70 percent of household expenditures. Although Title II distributed food aid should not include rice, the ration could consist of sorghum, pulses, corn soy blend, and refined vegetable oil. As for monetization, USAID-BEST recommends wheat grain, processed wheat flour, and refined vegetable oil as appropriate commodities. View a Snapshot of the Report.

Malawi USAID-BEST Analysis, 2013.

The Malawi USAID-BEST Analysis assesses the state of agricultural markets in Malawi as of April 2013 to inform future food security programming. This study presents an overview of local markets and food security programs, an assessment of the feasibility of monetization, and recommendations for upcoming program design. Most Malawians view maize as the only real food and see their ability to access it as their level of food security. This overdependence continues to have negative implications for overall food security, as does the lack of food movement from surplus areas in the North to deficit areas in the South because of low purchasing power. Recommendations for future Title II programs include: prioritizing prevention of early childhood malnutrition, shifting from community based targeting to indicator based targeting to reduce inclusion error, and locally procuring pulses for inclusion in food aid rations. The team finds crude degummed soybean oil and Hard Red Winter wheat are viable monetization commodities to fund a future Title II development program. View a Snapshot of the Report.

About the Project

Food aid can affect local economies of developing countries. The USAID-BEST project analyzes local markets to assess the impact of a potential food aid program on a country's local economy. USAID-BEST recommendations include practical steps donors and private voluntary organizations can take to ensure food security program design supports local markets to reach critical food security goals. The USAID-BEST project presents these findings and recommendations in a Congressionally mandated report often referred to as a Bellmon analysis. USAID-BEST analyses have resulted in smart, objective, evidence-based food aid programming decisions.

USAID-BEST also provides technical seminars on food aid in the context of local markets. USAID-BEST seminars have informed and increased the in-house technical capacity of US government agencies overseeing food security programs.

The project is funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Office of Food for Peace (FFP).

The US government's global hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future, invests in inclusive agriculture-led growth and targeted nutrition approaches to address the root causes of hunger and poverty. USAID-BEST is not a Feed the Future-funded project, though our analyses of local production and marketing of staple foods contribute to Feed the Future goals by supplying critical information to food security decision makers. USAID-BEST studies provide recommendations to ensure food aid does not harm local agricultural markets, and that food aid programs are appropriately designed regarding commodity selection and rations in terms of targeted households.

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